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InTheMarket.ie Guide to Managing Chickens in a Coop during Winter

Winter may be a difficult time for new poultry owners. You might be worried if your chickens will stay warm enough to lay eggs or if they will stop laying eggs altogether. Don’t worry—even in the coldest months, these methods will keep your chickens happy and healthy.

  1. Chickens don’t need a heater

Winter may be a difficult time for new poultry owners. You might be worried if your chickens will stay warm enough to lay eggs or if they will stop laying eggs altogether. Don’t worry—even in the coldest months, these methods will keep your chickens happy and healthy.

  1. Use Deep Litter to keep them warm

The deep litter method entails allowing bedding material and chicken poop to accumulate in the coop throughout the spring, summer, and fall, so that by winter, there is roughly a foot of composting material on the coop’s floor. The heat generated by the composting poop and bedding will naturally warm the coop.

  1. They may not lay unless you supplement light

Throughout the winter, some birds are excellent layers. However, if you want to keep your family or customers in eggs all winter, you’ll need extra light. Supplementing light, on the other hand, has some drawbacks, including stressing the birds and potentially shortening their laying life. So think about the advantages and disadvantages.

  1. Feed them corn in the evening to keep them warm at night

Giving your chickens some cracked corn before bedtime gives them something to digest during the night, keeping them warm. It’s their favorite food, and full bellies will make them happier.

  1. Hang a head of cabbage for a chicken play toy

Chickens, like humans, can get bored and stir-crazy during the winter. In the coop, they seem to enjoy a head of cabbage on a string. While it bobs about, they go crazy pecking at it. To keep your hens happy, try this simple trick.

  1. Make them a nice sun room

If you’re concerned that your hens won’t have enough room in the coop, you can add a cold frame or greenhouse-style addition to your structure and cover it with clear plastic. On nice days, they’ll wander out into it for a little more space, and you can relax knowing they’re not too crowded and getting some fresh air.

  1. Vaseline or similar, protects combs and wattles from frostbite

Breeds with big combs and wattles may be prone to frostbite in the coldest winter climes. You can protect them by smearing petroleum jelly on their combs and wattles. If your chickens do get frostbite, it’s usually not serious because only the tops of their combs are affected—but it can look ugly.

  1. Chickens don’t like snow

Chickens, in general, will not walk out into the snow once the temperature drops below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. You might make it more appealing for them by scattering hay or straw on the ground. When the temperature is in the low 30s, they don’t appear to mind as much strolling in the snow.

  1. Chickens don’t have to be inside in bad weather

Chickens will go into the coop if they don’t want to be outside. Allow them to do whatever they want. They’re tougher than you might expect, and they’re not as afraid of the cold as many people believe. Don’t waste time and energy attempting to keep them inside while it’s raining or snowing.

Robo Coop 5 Hens

 

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